Category: History of India

Akbar The Great

Akbar The Great

| September 23, 2012 | Reply

Emperor Akbar, also known as Akbar the Great or Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar, was the third emperor of the Mughal Empire, after Babur and Humayun. He was the son of Nasiruddin Humayun and succeeded him as the emperor in the year 1556, when he was only 13 years old. One of the most successful emperors of […]

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Ashoka The Great (304BC–232 BC)

Ashoka The Great (304BC–232 BC)

| September 23, 2012 | Reply

Early life Ashoka was born to the Mauryan emperor Bindusara and his queen, Dharmā [or Dhammā]. He was the grandson of Chandragupta Maurya, founder of Mauryan dynasty. Ashokāvadāna states that his mother was a queen named Subhadrangī, the daughter of Champa of Telangana. Queen Subhadrangī was a Brahmin of the Ajivika sect. Sage Pilindavatsa (aias Janasana) was a kalupaga Brahmin of the Ajivika sect […]

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Bindusara (320 BC – 272 BC, Ruled 298 BC–272 BC)

Bindusara (320 BC – 272 BC, Ruled 298 BC–272 BC)

| September 23, 2012 | Reply

Bindusara was the second Mauryan emperor (320 BC – 272 BC, Ruled 298 BC–272 BC) after Chandragupta Maurya. During his reign, the empire expanded southwards. He had two well-known sons, Susima and Ashoka, who were the viceroys of Takshashila andUjjain. The Greeks called him Amitrochates or Allitrochades – the Greek transliteration for the Sanskrit word ‘Amitraghata’ (Slayer of enemies). He was also called ‘Ajatashatru’ (Man with no enemies) in Sanskrit (not to […]

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Chandragupta Maurya (Born 340 BC, Ruled 320 BC– 298 BC)

Chandragupta Maurya (Born 340 BC, Ruled 320 BC– 298 BC)

| September 23, 2012 | Reply

Chandragupta Maurya (Born 340 BC, Ruled 320 BC– 298 BC) Chandragupta Maurya (Born 340 BC, Ruled 320 BC– 298 BC) was the founder of the Maurya Empire. He succeeded in conquering almost all of the Indian subcontinent and is considered the first unifier of India as well as its first genuine emperor. In foreign Greek and Latin accounts, Chandragupta is known as Sandrokyptos Sandrokottos or Androcottus. Prior to […]

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Maurya Empire (322 BC–185 BC)

Maurya Empire (322 BC–185 BC)

| September 23, 2012 | Reply

Maurya Empire (322 BC–185 BC) The Maurya Empire was a geographically extensive Iron Age historical power in ancient India, ruled by the Mauryan dynastyfrom 321 to 185 BC. Originating from the kingdom of Magadha in the Indo-Gangetic plains (modern Bihar, eastern Uttar Pradeshand Bengal) in the eastern side of the Indian subcontinent, the empire had its capital city at Pataliputra (modern Patna). The Empire was founded in 322 BC by Chandragupta Maurya, who had overthrown the Nanda […]

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Gupta Empire (320 CE–600s CE)

Gupta Empire (320 CE–600s CE)

| August 21, 2012 | Reply

Gupta Empire The Gupta Empire was an ancient Indian empire which existed from approximately 320 to 550 CE and covered much of the Indian Subcontinent. Founded by Maharaja Sri Gupta, the dynasty was the model of a classical civilisation. The peace and prosperity created under the leadership of the Guptas enabled the pursuit of scientific and artistic endeavors. This period is called the […]

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Kushan Empire (30-375)

Kushan Empire (30-375)

| August 21, 2012 | Reply

The Kushan Empire originally formed in the early 1st century AD under Kujula Kadphises in the territories of ancient Bactria around the Oxus River (Amu Darya), and later based near  Kabul, Afghanistan. “The Kushan Empire spread from the Kabul River Valley to defeat otherCentral Asian tribes that had previously conquered parts of the northern central Iranian Plateau once ruled by the Parthians.” During the 1st and early 2nd centuries […]

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Sunga Empire (185 BC- 75BC)

Sunga Empire (185 BC- 75BC)

| August 21, 2012 | Reply

Sunga Empire (185 BC- 75BC) The Sunga Empire or Shunga Empire was a Aryan dynasty from Magadha that controlled vast areas of the Indian Subcontinent from around 185 to 73 BCE. The dynasty was established by Pusyamitra Sunga, after the fall of theMaurya Empire. Its capital was Pataliputra, but later emperors such as Bhagabhadra also held court at Besnagar, modernVidisha in Eastern Malwa. Pushyamitra Sunga ruled for 36 years and was succeeded […]

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Early Middle Kingdoms — The Golden Age

Early Middle Kingdoms — The Golden Age

| August 21, 2012 | Reply

 Early Middle Kingdoms — The Golden Age The middle period was a time of cultural development. The Satavahana dynasty, also known as the Andhras, ruled in southern and central India after around 230 BCE. Satakarni, the sixth ruler of the Satvahana dynasty, defeated the Sunga Empire of north India. Afterwards, Kharavela, the warrior king of […]

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The Sātavāhana Empire

The Sātavāhana Empire

| August 21, 2012 | Reply

The Sātavāhana Empire The Sātavāhana Empire  or Andhra Empire, was a royal Indian dynasty based from Dharanikota and Amaravati in Andhra Pradesh as well as Junnar (Pune) and Prathisthan (Paithan) in Maharashtra. The territory of the empire covered much of India from 230 BCE onward. Although there is some controversy about when the dynasty came […]

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Late Middle Kingdoms — The Classical Age

Late Middle Kingdoms — The Classical Age

| August 21, 2012 | Reply

The “Classical Age” in India began with the Gupta Empire and the resurgence of the north during Harsha’s conquests around the 7th century CE, and ended with the fall of the Vijayanagara Empire in the south in the 13th century, due to pressure from the invaders to the north. This period produced some of India’s […]

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The Islamic Sultanates

The Islamic Sultanates

| August 21, 2012 | Reply

The Islamic Sultanates Beginning in the 12th century, several Islamic states were established in the Indian subcontinent in the course of a gradual Muslim conquest in the Indian subcontinent. This process culminated in the Mughal Empire, which ruled most of India during the mid-16th to mid-19th centuries. The end of the period of Islamic rule […]

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The Maratha Empire (1674–1820)

The Maratha Empire (1674–1820)

| August 20, 2012 | Reply

The Maratha Empire The Maratha Empire (also transliterated Mahratta) or the Maratha Confederacy was an Indian imperial power that existed from 1674 to 1818. At its peak, the empire covered much of what would become India, encompassing a territory of over 2.8 million km².The Marathas are credited for the re-establishment of Hindu rule in India. […]

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The Mughal Empire

The Mughal Empire

| August 20, 2012 | Reply

The Mughal Empire The Mughal Empire or Mogul (also Moghul) Empire in traditional English usage, was an imperial power in the Indian subcontinent from about 1526 to 1757 (though it lingered for another century). The Mughal emperors were Muslims and direct descendants of Genghis Khan through Chagatai Khan and Timur. At the height of their […]

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History of early modern period of India

History of early modern period of India

| August 19, 2012 | Reply

Early modern period Mughal Empire Mughal Empire In 1526, Babur, a Timurid descendant of Timur and Genghis Khan from Fergana Valley (modern day Uzbekistan), swept across the Khyber Pass and established the Mughal Empire, covering modern day Afghanistan, Pakistan, India and Bangladesh. However, his son Humayun was defeated by the Afghan warrior Sher Shah Suri […]

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The Indian Rebellion of 1857

The Indian Rebellion of 1857

| August 19, 2012 | Reply

The Indian Rebellion of 1857 The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of sepoys of the East India Company’s army on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon escalated into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhiregion. The rebellion posed a considerable threat to […]

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Colonial India

Colonial India

| August 19, 2012 | Reply

Colonial India In 1498, Vasco da Gama successfully discovered a new sea route from Europe to India, which paved the way for direct Indo-European commerce. The Portuguese soon set up trading posts in Goa, Daman, Diu and Bombay. The next to arrive were the Dutch, the British—who set up a trading post in the west coast port of Surat in 1619—and the French. The internal conflicts among Indian kingdoms […]

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Indian Councils Act 1909 (The Morley-Minto reforms of 1909 )

Indian Councils Act 1909 (The Morley-Minto reforms of 1909 )

| August 19, 2012 | Reply

The Indian Councils Act 1909 (9 Edw. 7 c. 4), commonly known as the Morley-Minto Reforms, was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that brought about a limited increase in the involvement of Indians in the governance of British India. John Morley, the Liberal Secretary of State for India, and the Conservative Governor-General of India, The Earl of Minto, believed that cracking down […]

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British Raj

British Raj

| August 19, 2012 | Reply

Reforms during British Raj When the Lord Curzon (Viceroy 1899-1905) took control of higher education and then split the large province of Bengal into a largely Hindu western half and “Eastern Bengal and Assam,” a largely Muslim eastern half. The British goal was efficient administration but Hindus were outraged at the apparent “divide and rule” strategy.” When the Liberal […]

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The partition of India

The partition of India

| August 19, 2012 | Reply

The partition of India The partition of India  was the partition of British India on the basis of religious demographics. This led to the creation of the sovereign states of the Dominion of Pakistan (that later split again into the Islamic Republic of Pakistan and the People’s Republic of Bangladesh) and the Union of India (later Republic of India). Indian Independence Act 1947 had decided 15 August 1947 as the appointed […]

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